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Dog food made from insects to be launched in UK
20 per cent of global meat is used for pet food.

Brighton start-up produces “sustainable” dog food

This week sees the launch of the UK’s first dog food made from insects by start-up company, Yora.

According to a report by the BBC, the product aims to reduce the environmental damage caused by the vast quantities of meat farmed for food and the resultant emissions of CO2.

Currently, 20 per cent of global meat is used for pet food.

The BBC spoke with Dr Aarti Kathrani, senior lecturer in small animal internal medicine at the Royal Veterinary College, who commented that “insects can be a very useful source of protein”.

Dr Kathrani added, however, that: "More studies are needed to show how much of these nutrients can actually be absorbed by a dog's body – but some studies suggest that insects can provide nutrients for dogs."

Asked whether an insect-based diet could be suitable for cats, Dr Kathrani explained to the BBC that, while cats are far less flexible in their dietary needs, insects do contain taurine – indicating that insects may be able to form a useful part of their diet.

Yora was set-up by Tom Neish in Brighton. On the company’s website, he describes himself as “proud to present the world’s most sustainable dog food".

The insects bred for use are themselves fed on food waste from the Netherlands.

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Huge spike in ‘designer’ dogs going into rescue

News Story 1
 The RSPCA has reported a huge spike in the number of ‘designer’ dogs arriving into its care.

Figures published by the charity show there has been a 517 per cent increase in the number of French bulldogs arriving into its kennels. During that time, the charity has also seen an increase in dachshunds, chihuahuas, and crossbreeds.

RSPCA dog welfare expert Lisa Hens said: “We know that the breeds of dog coming into our care often reflect the trends in dog ownership in the wider world and, at the moment, it doesn’t get more trendy than ‘designer’ dogs like French bulldogs and Dachshunds."

 

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News Shorts
AHDB Pork calls for stepped-up biosecurity

Pig farmers are being urged to step up biosecurity to reduce the risk of swine dysentery in their herds.

According to Farmers Weekly, AHDB Pork have confirmed cases in the north and east of the UK and is calling on producers to focus on hygiene to protect their animals.

Members of the AHDB Pork Significant diseases charter are reported to have been informed of the outbreaks.