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Labour calls for review of ‘driven’ grouse shooting
“There are viable alternatives to grouse shooting such as simulated shooting and wildlife tourism."

Review ‘should look at alternatives and environmental impacts’

The Labour Party has called for a review of ‘driven’ grouse shooting, to explore its economic and environmental impacts, and consider viable alternatives.

Labour’s shadow environment secretary, Sue Hayman MP, called for the review on 12 August - known as the Glorious Twelfth - which marks the beginning of the four-month grouse shooting season.

Driven shooting is the most common mode of hunting grouse and involves a row of people (beaters) walking and pushing the grouse over a line of guns concealed in grouse butts.

Suggested alternatives include simulated shooting and wildlife tourism.

Sue Hayman said: “The costs of grouse shooting on our environment and wildlife needs to be to properly weighed up against the benefit of land owners profiting from shooting parties. For too long the Tories have bent the knee to land owners and it’s our environment and our people who pay the price.

“There are viable alternatives to grouse shooting such as simulated shooting and wildlife tourism. The time has come for a proper review into the practice.”
Labour’s call for a review will be included in its Animal Welfare Manifesto, to be launched at the end of August.

The British Association for Shooting & Conservation responded in a statement: ‘… The Labour review needs to hear from the people on the ground who maintain grouse moors with massive benefits for conservation and the environment.

'When they’ve heard the facts we expect Labour to support the massive economic benefits to marginal upland communities that grouse shooting delivers.’

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Endangered turtles rescued from smugglers

News Story 1
 A group of endangered turtles have found a new home at London Zoo after being rescued from smugglers.

The four big-headed turtles arrived at the zoo at the end of last year, after smugglers tried to illegally import them to Canada, labelled as toys.

One of the turtles, named Lady Triệu after a Vietnamese warrioress, has moved to a new exhibit in the zoo’s reptile house. She is the only one of her kind in a UK zoo.

Big-headed turtles have such large heads that they cannot pull them back into their shells. To compensate, they have armour plating from head to tail and a very sharp beak to fend off predators. They are ranked number 18 on ZSL’s EDGE of Existence reptile list, which puts threatened species at the forefront of conservation action. Image © ZSL  

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RCVS Fellowship board chair elections get underway

Voting for the 2019 RCVS Fellowship Chair election is now underway. This year four candidates are standing for election, including Dr Robert Huey, Professor John Innes, Professor Liz Mossop and Professor Ian Ramsey.

The Chair will attend and preside over Fellowship meetings and take the lead in consolidating the Fellowship’s position as the learned society of the RCVS. Fellows will receive an email containing a link to the online voting form, as well as candidates’ details and manifestos. Voting closes at 5pm on Thursday, 5 September.